Effects


Selection of effect in the search

In the job effect search, it is possible to specify the effect measurement or effect type on which the effect searched is to be based. If the effect has been specified, only the results for the relevant effect measurement or effect type will be included in the effect searched. If the effect measurement isn't defined all results based on the four primary effect measurements (employment, self-support, unemployment and fit to return to work) will be shown automatically. 

Effect measurement

The "Effect measurement" are divided into primary and secondary effect measurements. The primary effect measurements are: 

  • Employment
  • Self-support
  • Unemployment
  • Fit to return to work

The secondary effect measurements are: 

  • Labour supply
  • Training/education
  • Progression 
  • Active labour market programmes 

The effect can be further specified for each of the overall effect measurements. For example, under "Employment" it is possible to select the effect measurements: exit to employment and percentage of employed individuals. 

Effect type

Under "Effect type", the effect can be specified as:

  • Net effect
  • Motivation effect
  • Programme effect
  • Lock-in effect
  • Sorting effect

The net effect is the overall effect of the motivation effect, lock-in effect and programme effect, and expresses how much the active labour market intervention increases the unemployed individual's probability of getting a job. Often, the net effect will be the sum of the lock-in effect and the programme effect.

The motivation effect occurs because the prospect of having to participate in an active labour market programme or interview motivates unemployed individuals to find employment before the active intervention period begins. The motivation effect can also have the opposite effect if unemployed individuals find the active labour market programme particularly interesting, and this can reduce the incentive to find employment. This is also referred to as an "attraction effect".

The programme effect occurs because unemployed individuals have obtained new competences, skills, qualifications etc. that make them more qualified to find a job after having participated in an active labour market programme. However, the effect can also be negative if the skills-upgrading results in a more narrow job search, for example.

The lock-in effect occurs because unemployed individuals have a less intensive job-search activity while participating in an active labour market programme. This may be because the unemployed individuals want to complete their current programme or because the time available for job search is reduced in the active labour market programme period. However, the lock-in effect can also have the opposite effect if unemployed individuals increase their search intensity in periods when participating in an active labour market programme.

The sorting effect occurs because the active labour market intervention can affect entry to unemployment for individuals in employment and in education or training. For example, the prospect of having to participate in active labour market programmes and to meet the requirements for availability can make unemployment less attractive, so individuals are more likely to avoid unemployment insofar as they can influence their own employment status.

The sorting effect affects employed individuals before unemployment and thereby their entry to unemployment, whereas the other three effects affect unemployed individuals at different times in the actual unemployment period. The motivation effect affects unemployed individuals before the active labour market programme, the lock-in effect affects unemployed individuals during the active labour market programme and the programme effect affects unemployed individuals after the active labour market programme.